PopEntertainment.com

It's all the entertainment you need!

 

FEATURE STORIES MOVIE REVIEWS MUSIC REVIEWS BOX SET REVIEWS TV SHOWS ON DVD CONTESTS CONCERT PHOTOS

 

 

  FEATURE STORIES
  INTERVIEWS A TO E
  INTERVIEWS F TO J
  INTERVIEWS K TO O
  INTERVIEWS P TO T
  INTERVIEWS U TO Z
  INTERVIEWS ACTORS
  INTERVIEWS ACTRESSES
  INTERVIEWS BOOKS
  INTERVIEWS DIRECTORS AND SCREENWRITERS
  INTERVIEWS MUSIC
  INTERVIEWS OSCAR NOMINEES
  INTERVIEWS THEATER
  IN MEMORIAM
  REVIEWS
  MOVIE REVIEWS
  MUSIC REVIEWS
  CONCERT REVIEWS
  BOX SET REPORT CARD
  TV SHOWS ON DVD
  MISCELLANEOUS STUFF & NONSENSE
  CONCERT PHOTOGRAPHY
  LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
  CONTESTS
  LINKS
  MASTHEAD
  EMAIL US

"WILD YEARS-THE MUSIC & MYTH OF TOM WAITS" BY JAY S. JACOBS

AVAILABLE IN BOOK STORES EVERYWHERE!

 

www.wbshop.com

PopEntertainment.com > Reviews > Movie Reviews > The Tripper

MOVIE REVIEWS

THE TRIPPER (2006)

Starring Richmond Arquette, Paz De La Huerta, Balthazar Getty, Redmond Gleeson, Lukas Haas, Stephen Heath, Brad Hunt, Thomas Jane, Jaime King, Jason Mewes, Christopher Nelson, Paul Reubens, Marsha Thomason, David Arquette and Courtney Cox Arquette.

Screenplay by David Arquette and Joe Harris.

Directed by David Arquette.

Distributed by Coquette Productions.  93 minutes.  Rated R.

The Tripper

Just when you think that there is no horror film idea that can surprise you, there comes something like The Tripper – which if nothing else has a truly unique concept. 

A weekend music festival being held deep in the backwoods is stalked by an axe-wielding maniac in a Ronald Reagan mask with a taste for hippie blood.  As he stumbles through the brush, in a blue power suit and tie which never seems to get his victims' blood on it – he imitates little political soundbytes about Nancy and Patti and just saying no – all the while trying to tear down their walls.

It is the first red state vs. blue state slaughter fest. 

Co-written and directed by comic actor David Arquette and co-produced with wife Courtney Cox Arquette (who also has a cameo appearance) it seems an odd choice of subject matter for them – until you remember that they have a history in horror together.  The couple met when making the first Scream movie in the 90s.

It gives lots of Arquette's hipster friends – including Cox, Jason Mewes, Lukas Haas, Marsha Thomason, Paul Reubens, Balthazar Getty and others – the opportunity to die horrifically on camera.

It also takes lots of political potshots – many at Reagan (the most overrated President of our lifetime), some more at George W.  Many of them are deserved, yet the savagery of the goings on around them totally overpowers any kind of political points that Arquette may be trying to make.  Also, it doesn't really help his points that in general the hippies and left-leaning sorts in the film are every bit as big assholes as any of the rednecks (well, with the exception of the killer, of course.).  The kids at the concert are drug-addled, sex-addicted, selfish and stupid.  I know that is sort of Arquette's point, but it still muddies the waters.

Of course Ronnie is not completely partisan, he kills lots of rednecks as well as the hippies.  ("But I'm a Republican," is the last thing whimpered by one of the victims as he faces the ax.)

Which leads you to wonder, is Arquette trying to make an old school slasher film or a very dark political comedy?  Honestly, it's a bit of an uncomfortable fit. 

To give you an idea of the level of the political satire here, one of the main suspects has a black SUV with vanity license plates which reads "REDST8S."  When the Sheriff interrupts the killer in one of his murderous attempts, the lawman says contemptuously "Is this what you call compassionate conservatism?"

No, nothing is subtle in The Tripper, including some of the most realistic cinematic depictions of an acid trip ever filmed (which is, honestly, kind of interesting).  The violence and gore is totally over the top.  There is full-frontal nudity of both sexes.  The characters, on both sides of the political divide, are clichéd stereotypes. 

After all the mayhem, the movie ends on an odd note, running over the closing credits a reggae-backed speech by Robert Kennedy, Jr. about the dangers of ignoring the environment.  It's a stirring, scary, important speech, but it feels completely out of place after the 90 minutes of gore, drugs and debauchery which have preceded it.  I suppose that it's nice that Arquette tried to get people to listen to it any way he could, but I have the feeling that the kind of people who want to see The Tripper will already be halfway up the aisle (or pressing the eject button) long before Kennedy's vital message is delivered.

Jay S. Jacobs

Copyright ©2007 PopEntertainment.com.  All rights reserved.  Posted: October 10, 2007.

RETURN TO MOVIE REVIEWS MENU

Copyright ©2007   PopEntertainment.com.  All rights reserved.  Posted: October 10, 2007.

 

Enter Gotham City with Batman Costumes from Spirit Halloween! Protect or destroy the city as Batgirl, Robin, or the Joker. Shop now!