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PopEntertainment.com > Reviews > Record Reviews > Seymour Glass

MUSIC REVIEWS

 

Seymour Glass-Note to Self (Fourfivesix Entertainment)

This New York pop-punk band has been sort of flying under the radar of the music biz, but they are good enough that they should be gaining notice real soon. 

Seymour Glass (that's the band name: the members are Artie Kitchen on vocals, James Federico on bass and piano, Steven Pepe on guitar and Sal Guanti on percussion) is one of those alt bands that does remember that it isn't good enough to just thud people over the head, you got to have some chops and some tunes to keep the people listening. 

The album trips into overdrive from the first song, in which the martial drums of "Hypervent" pound out a musical warning that this is a group that won't be ignored.  "Trigger Finger" trips along on a deceptively light piano line before the other instruments and feedback crash in to make a fascinating collage of sound. 

"Rocket Science" starts off with a vaguely psychedelic vibe and "Car Crash" has a surprisingly gorgeous verse before an angry chorus.  The album closes with the delicately beautiful rock ballad "Everytime."

It's good to see that there are still bands that recognize the importance of melody.  After all, underneath all the bombast the Clash and Nirvana were just damned good pop bands.  After a few years of angry white kids yelling, it's nice to see that lesson isn't lost.

So be the first on your block to catch onto the Seymour Glass bandwagon.  It'll make you look smart when the rest of them jump on board.  (8/04)

Jay S. Jacobs

Copyright 2005 PopEntertainment.com. All rights reserved. Posted January 16, 2005.

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Copyright 2005 PopEntertainment.com. All rights reserved. Posted January 16, 2005.