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PopEntertainment.com > Reviews > Record Reviews > Kylie Minogue

MUSIC REVIEWS

Kylie Minogue-Body Language (Capitol)

You don't get to be a diva for going on twenty years without a little chameleon in you.  After a few missteps in the 90s, Kylie Minogue has shown an amazing ability to adapt to the changing styles and subjects of the musical world; reinventing herself again and again so that as a woman in her mid-thirties she is every bit as with it as she was when she originally came to notice as an cute eighteen-year-old actress-singer. 

With Body Language, the follow up to her smash US comeback CD Fever, Minogue and her compatriots pull off the not unimpressive feat of making a modern techno album that feels strangely timeless.  In fact, Body Language seems to be the album that Madonna was trying unsuccessfully to make with American Life... a musical statement that was at once completely up-to-date and yet would not scare off long time fans. 

Sometimes, in songs like the impossibly sultry bedroom jam "Chocolate" and the torrid single "Slow," the songs are undeniably sterile dance tracks and yet Minogue's cooing voice and innate songcrafting ability heat up what could be a cool dish.  Retro-vibed dance tracks like "Obsession" and "I Feel For You" seem wonderfully timeless, these songs could have been hits in the 80s, 90s or today.  "Still Standing" uses a clever quote from Lisa-Lisa and Cult Jam's "I Wonder If I Take You Home" to ground the song in a funky place.

Very few veteran artists can do a techno-colored album any justice.  Heavy hitters like U2, Madonna, David Bowie and many others have failed miserably.  Who'd have thought the tiny Australian thrush who just three years ago was best known in the US for a chirpy Hi-NRG 1988 remake of "The Loco-Motion" would be one of the few who could do it right?  (2/04)

Jay S. Jacobs

Copyright 2004 PopEntertainment.com. All rights reserved. Posted: February 8, 2004.

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Copyright 2002-2004 PopEntertainment.com. All rights reserved. Revised: January 31, 2016.

Kylie Minogue-Fever (Capitol)

Kylie Minogue is a goddess in Europe and her native Australia, rating on the same level as Madonna (in fact, the Material Girl was known to wear Kylie t-shirts on her last tour.)  But in the United States, she has just made a few blips on the pop culture radar since her 1988 debut album... helmed by then-Hi NRG hit gurus Stock/Aitken/Waterman... had three US top 40 singles, including the ecstatic dance floor twirler “I Should Be So Lucky” and a cover of the Little Eva/Grand Funk classic “The Loco-motion.”  In fact, Fever is Minogue’s first album released in the US since her unjustly overlooked 1990 gem Enjoy Yourself. 

In the time since then, Minogue has popped up on these shores once in a blue moon: doing a soundtrack single from a long-forgotten Richard Grieco film (is there any other kind of Richard Grieco film?); dating late-INXS front man Michael Hutchence; starring in the video-game film Street Fighter; dueting on the delightfully twisted alt-single “Where the Wild Roses Grow” with Nick Cave; portraying a good fairy on last year’s hit musical Moulin Rouge.  But finally Minogue is back in the States with a vengeance. 

Fever is a wonderful dance album, at once timeless and much more with it and up-to-date than I could imagine former S/A/W contemporaries Rick Astley and Dead Or Alive making.   The album is previewed by the almost naggingly catchy smash hit “Can’t Get You Out Of My Head” which rides an insanely propulsive “La La La” bridge into your heart and mind.  And the wonderful thing is that this record isn’t just a one hit pony, there are several other songs here that deserve to be smashes on the same level, including the poppy “Love At First Sight,” the retro-disco “Dancefloor” and the techno-laced “Burning Up.”  Best of all is the wondrous carbonated ambrosia of the title track.  F. Scott Fitzgerald was wrong.  Kylie Minogue is proof positive that there really are second acts in American life.  (3/02)

Jay S. Jacobs

Copyright 2002 PopEntertainment.com. All rights reserved. Posted: April 12, 2002.