PopEntertainment.com

It's all the entertainment you need!

 

FEATURE STORIES MOVIE REVIEWS MUSIC REVIEWS BOX SET REVIEWS TV SHOWS ON DVD CONTESTS CONCERT PHOTOS

 

 

  FEATURE STORIES
  INTERVIEWS A TO E
  INTERVIEWS F TO J
  INTERVIEWS K TO O
  INTERVIEWS P TO T
  INTERVIEWS U TO Z
  INTERVIEWS ACTORS
  INTERVIEWS ACTRESSES
  INTERVIEWS BOOKS
  INTERVIEWS DIRECTORS AND SCREENWRITERS
  INTERVIEWS MUSIC
  INTERVIEWS OSCAR NOMINEES
  INTERVIEWS THEATER
  IN MEMORIAM
  REVIEWS
  MOVIE REVIEWS
  MUSIC REVIEWS
  CONCERT REVIEWS
  BOX SET REPORT CARD
  TV SHOWS ON DVD
  MISCELLANEOUS STUFF & NONSENSE
  CONCERT PHOTOGRAPHY
  LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
  CONTESTS
  LINKS
  MASTHEAD
  EMAIL US

"WILD YEARS-THE MUSIC & MYTH OF TOM WAITS" BY JAY S. JACOBS

AVAILABLE IN BOOK STORES EVERYWHERE!

 

www.wbshop.com

PopEntertainment.com > Feature Interviews - Actors > Features Interviews F to J > In Memoriam > Peter Falk

In memory of Peter Falk - September 16, 1927-June 23, 2011

PETER FALK

REVEALS A FEW THINGS

by Brad Balfour

Copyright ©2005 PopEntertainment.com.   All rights reserved.  Posted: September 28, 2005.

Though by now veteran actor Peter Falk may always be playing a bit of Peter Falk in every role he does, that archetype works perfectly well when he plays the oh-so-Jewish father in Paul Reiser's feature, The Thing About My Folks. If any movie does a classic riff on the experience of growing up with Jewish parents, this is it. And Falk embodies the ever-responsible and too-often clueless dad, Sam Kleinman, who finally learns a few more truths about his family later in life.

How did Paul Reiser first approach you about being in this film?

I was in a play and he came backstage and started blabbing about the play. Within the previous week, I had seen an episode of Mad About you, so I said to him, cutting him off, that he's a helluva writer! Now he claims that that had inspired him to write the script. Next, I got a call from Joe Mantegna that Paul Reiser has a script. I called Paul up and he sent it over. I read it the first night and I thought it was interesting. On page 45 or 55, I called him up and told him I'll do it. I didn't even finish it--I knew right away.

What is it that you look for in a screenplay?

Sometimes the money. Oh, yeah. That's been known to happen. Other than that, you look for a character that you can score in. If I like the character and people are going to laugh and find it interesting--that's what I look for. But I can't put a definition on it. I don't care if he's grumpy, old, young, or manic.

Do you wonder why you were sent some scripts in the first place?

I receive scripts that I wonder why they would send it to anybody!

Is your father anywhere in Sam, the character you play?

My father did believe in work. He was from that generation. He had a store and the store opened at 9:00 AM. He started sweeping the floor at 6:30 AM. What he did between 7:00 and 9:00, I don't know. (laughs) He loved his store. This is very similar to Sam's character.

Was your father supportive when you wanted to become an actor?

When I told him that I'm going to become an actor, he replied, "You're gonna paint your face and make an ass out of yourself for the rest of your life!" What a great man!

What did you say in return?

I said, "Yes, that's right!" and then he pulled out his hand and said, ”Good luck!"

Did you have any kind of interaction with your father like you had with Ben, Paul Reiser's character, as you were lying on the grass with him in the film?

No. But that's a great scene! Laying in the woods, a little drunk and ending up with a connection. That scene, as emotional as it is, should end up with a big laugh. I'll leave that up to Paul Reiser.

Do you think it's inevitable that we become our parents as we get older?

It's not inevitable, but it's likely.

Do you see your parents in yourself?

Sometimes I see my father in me.

Did you and Paul do a lot of bonding off the set do have the father-son camaraderie?

It was automatic. We were always on the same wavelength even before we started shooting. We went to dinner together.

What did your wife think about this film?

She loved it, just like everybody else.

Did she see a lot of you in the character you play?

When she watches the movie, she just wants her husband to be good. That's the way she looks at it.

Were you aware that you would begin the movie naked in talcum powder?

Yes, that was in the script. I loved that scene.

Do you really use talcum powder?

Yes, I do. But not that much. (laughs)

How many takes did you have during the scene when you read the letter?

That's also one of my favorite scenes. Nobody can anticipate the one word that I had to say after I read the letter. When I read it, I laughed so hard, I fell off my chair. It's just terrific writing!

You and (your co-star and cinematic wife) Olympia Dukakis never met before. How did you click?

I have never met anyone in my life that I got to like so thoroughly, so fast. We were together for about ten minutes before we were going to shoot. I liked her so much. I felt so comfortable around her. Usually, when I meet somebody that unique, I get nervous because I want to make a good impression. But with her, I was at ease. She is something!

Did you drive through Ossining, your childhood town, while filming the movie?

No, but we were very close to it.

Were your action scenes in this film with or without a stunt double?

No, not even when I had to let out gas! (laughs)

What was your favorite scene after you watched the movie?

When I has the fight with the guy in the poolhall. I had the cue stick and Paul was holding onto him. And I told him to apologize to the owner of the poolhall. His answer was totally ad-libbed. I never heard that before in my life. I loved it so much even though I was supposed to be mad at him. All he said was, "Eat shit and die!" You see the look in my face, which is so delighted. It wasn't even in the script.

Did you improvise the fishing scene?

It wasn't that we improvised it. We were going to shoot it. For the first time, I had the props in my hand. I was talking to Paul and I wanted to understand the props before we shot it. I asked him "Is this the hook?", "Where do you put the worm?" and thats when the director just said "Shoot these guys!" I didn't even know the camera was on, but once I realized it, it felt good!

Did you learn anything about fishing?

No, not really.

How do you feel about this movie opening on your birthday?

Yeah, that's right! That's good. I'll take that!

Is it a coincidence?

I think so.

How do you feel when somebody else imitates your voice and your characters?

I love it. When they do it on Columbo, that tickles me. I could sit there and watch it forever. I'll never have to go to a movie in my life! Kevin Pollack and all the others are great!

 Email us        Let us know what you think.

Features        Return to the features page

dmindbanner.gif (10017 bytes)

Photo Credits:
#1 © 2005.  Courtesy of Picturehouse Films.  All rights reserved.
#2 © 2005.  Courtesy of Picturehouse Films.  All rights reserved.
#3 © 2005.  Courtesy of Picturehouse Films.  All rights reserved.
#4 © 2005.  Courtesy of Picturehouse Films.  All rights reserved.

Copyright ©2005 PopEntertainment.com.   All rights reserved.  Posted: September 28, 2005.

Vegas Show Tickets

Copyright ©2005 PopEntertainment.com.   All rights reserved.  Posted: September 28, 2005.